Which of the following IPv6 addresses correctly represent the shortened version of the IP address 2031:0000:0000:130F:0000:0000:876A:130B? (Choose two.)

Which of the following IPv6 addresses correctly represent the shortened version of the IP address 2031:0000:0000:130F:0000:0000:876A:130B? (Choose two.)

  • 2031::130F::876A:130B
  • 2031::130F:0:0:876A:130B
  • 2031:0:130F::876A:130B
  • 2031:0:0:130F::876A:130B
Explanation:
2031:0000:0000:130F:0000:0000:876A:130B can be shortened to either 2031::130F:0:0:876A:130B or 2031:0:0:130F::876A:130B.IPv6 addresses are written in 16-bit hexadecimal number fields separated by a colon (:). There are a total of eight 16-bit fields, making each IPv6 address a total of 128 bits. The hexadecimal letters are NOT case sensitive.You can shorten an IPv6 address by removing the leading zeros in any address field. You can only remove zeros that are the first character in an address field. For example, FFC0:02C0: is the same as FFC0:2C0:. However, FFC0:8020 is not the same as FFC0:802:.If a 16-bit address field contains all zeros, then it can be represented by a single zero. For example, FF80:0000: is the same as FF80:0:.You can use double colons (::) to represent successive address fields of zeros. An address parser can determine the number of missing fields and then insert the proper number of zeros to complete the address. For example, FF80:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001 is the same as FF80::1, and 0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001 could be written as ::1. However, you can only have one set of double colons (::) in an address; therefore, FF80:0000:0000:0CB0:0000:0000:0000:0001 cannot be written as F80::0CB0::1.

Objective:
Layer 3 Technologies
Sub-Objective:
Identify IPv6 addressing and subnetting

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